Louisiana Affidavit of Heirship

Louisiana Heirship AffidavitThe Louisiana Affidavit of Heirship form is for a person, in most all accounts related to the deceased, to complete stating the heirs of the deceased person. The Louisiana Heirship Affidavit is used by the courts to establish ownership of all personal and real property not identified by a will. Louisiana Heirship Affidavits are recorded in official land records.

The heirship process must be started within a few years after the person died. There must be no will and there must be no need for administration of the deceased's estate. The heirship proceedings must be started in the county where the deceased lived, or in a county where the property of the deceased is located. If the decedent did not own any real property, then the proceedings may be started in the county where the decedent had personal property.

The person executing the affidavit should not be an heir of the deceased, or other person interested in the estate. Louisiana Heirship Affidavits must be signed by a notary public.

A Louisiana affidavit of heirship is used to state the heirs of a deceased person. It is commonly used to verify ownership of personal and real property. It may be recorded in Louisiana land records when needed to establish ownership.

The following is an example of the use of a Louisiana heirship affidavit: Someone dies without a will, leaves an heir, and no estate is opened. When the heir sells the land, the heir obtains an heirship affidavit in Louisiana to record with the deed to the estate. The person executing the affidavit of heirship in Louisiana should not be an heir of the deceased or other person interested in the estate. The Louisiana affidavit of heirship must be signed by a notary public.


Download a free Louisiana Affidavit of Heirship form online.



2 comments:

Anonymous said...

Is a surviving Father bound by a joint 1993 Succession based on Joint Will and La. Forced Heirship of deceased Mother's half of estate where Father had usufruct or is his alleged new Will presented by live in stranger after his death, 2004 at age 84 valid if it does not contain Just Cause to disinherit his childen from his half of family estate.

Anonymous said...

Beware - Adult disabiled children seem to have legal forced heirship rights, no matter how old they are entitled any part of the estate as well as total benefits from Social Security to the extent of removing the spouse from any right for spousal death benefits. So if you think you have any protection for your old age you might want to try to find some answers before you hit the nursing home and find that a disabiled child of you "loving husband" just got all you money! My next stop is a tin cup on Bourbon Street as I was a fool who trusted someone!